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TextWordPassage & CitationAnalysis Contributor(s)
Finnegans Wake humptyhillhead “the humptyhillhead of humself” (FW 003.20) Baby-talk: Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker’s hilly, ovoid head modelled in the fashion of Humpty Dumpty (see humself, prumptly, tumptytumtoes); Hillhead, Glasgow. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake humself “the humptyhillhead of humself” (FW 003.20) Himself (HCE) in the form of Humpty Dumpty, humming (see humptyhillhead, prumptly, tumptytumtoes) Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake kidscad "not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac" (FW 003.10-11) “Kid” and “cadet” (French, “junior”), hence young, as well as allusion to Jacob (“venison purveyor” (Selected Letters 317) who “got the blessing meant for Esau” (ibid). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake livvy “since devlinsfirst loved livvy” (FW 003.24-25) The river Liffey; Livia (as in Anna Livia Plurabelle, the progenitress of the Wake’s rivers). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake mishe “nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to taufauf thuartpeatrick” (FW 003.09-10) Irish: mise, “me” or “I am”. Here, an affirmative, ecstatic answer to “the windy words of the apostle”, as Joyce described them in a letter to Harriet Weaver (Selected Letters of James Joyce ed. Richard Ellmann, 317). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake mumper "they went doublin their mumper all the time" (FW 003.08-09) A begging impostor, (see McHugh), but also in this context “number”. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake nathandjoe “sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe” (FW 003.12) Nathan and Joe; Jonathan (in the context of the earlier allusion to Vanessa (see vanessy), this word alludes more specifically to Jonathan Swift. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake passencore “Sir Tristram […] had passencore rearrived from North Armorica” (FW 003.04-05) “Sir Tristram […] had passencore rearrived from North Armorica” echoes the French phrase “pas encore”: “not yet”. The introduction of an additional “s” further accommodates the French phrase, “passe encore”, meaning “still happening”. In French, something which “se passe” is bearable but by no means enjoyable. Such seems to be the case for Sir Tristram’s journey from “North Armorica” to “Europe Minor’’, and indeed the entire history of the Wake which follows. The word “passenger” may also be involved here. Joyce also mentions (Selected Letters 317) that the ricorsi storici of Vico are also being alluded to, presumably via the word “encore”. penisolate (003.06) In context with war (003.06) “peninsular”, as well as possibly referring to Isolde. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake pftjschute “The great fall of the offwall entailed at such short notice entailed the pftjschute of Finnegan” (FW 003.18-19) French: chute, fall (n.). Pronouncing the additional plosive prefixes “pft-” and “tj-” involves accentuating the prematurity and “short notice” of Finnegan’s chute verbally. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake prumptly “the humptyhillhead of humself prumptly send an unquiring one well to the west in quest of his tumptytumtoes” (FW 003.20-21) Baby-talk: promptly, in the style of Humpty Dumpty (see humptyhillhead, humself, tumptytumtoes). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen