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TextWordPassage & CitationAnalysis Contributor(s)
Finnegans Wake sosie “sosie sesthers” (FW 003.12) French: sosie, twin or counterpart. This can also be pronounced “saucy”. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Ulysses statelily "It passed statelily up the staircase, steered by an umbrella, a solemn beardframed face" (U 7.45-46) A further modification of "stately," which first appears in the novel's opening line. The "ly" suffix added to "state" turns it into an adjective: "stately," resembling a state, grand, large, impressive. The additional "ly" in "statelily" further transforms "stately" into an adverb. Thus we could gloss the above sentence as "it passes [in a manner resembling a state] up the staircase," or perhaps as "it passes [in a grand and impressive manner] up the staircase." Jeremy Colangelo
Finnegans Wake tauftauf “nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to taufauf thuartpeatrick” (FW 003.09-10) German: taufen, to baptise. “Tauf” also alludes to Taff, the twin brother of Butt. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake themselse "nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse" (FW 003.06-07) “another Dublin” (Joyce, Selected Letters 317). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake thuartpeatrick “nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to taufauf thuartpeatrick” (FW 003.09-10) Allusion to St. Patrick and his naming— “thou art Patrick”—which echoes Matthew 16:18: “thou art Peter [...]”. Also rick of peat. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake tumptytumtoes “in quest of his tumptytumtoes” (FW 003.21) Baby-talk: Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker’s Humpty Dumpty-esque toes (see humptyhillhead, humself, prumptly). Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake vanessy “[...] though all’s fair in vanessy” (FW 003.11-12) Portmanteau word: Vanessa, vanity. Vanessa serves as a model for Issy, who is repeatedly found facing her equivalent in the looking-glass world. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake venissoon “[...] not yet, though venissoon after [...]” (FW 003.10) Conflation of “venison”, “Vanessa” and “very soon”. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake vicus “a commodius vicus of recirculation” (FW 003.02) Latin: vicus, a village or a street. A “vicus […] of recirculation” evokes the circulating roads and peripheries of a village, which would facilitate such circular tracings as those described by the children in the opening of II.ii, for instance, who “wheel” around Dublin by following the North and South circular roads (260.08-261.22). Temporal circularity is further implied in the allusion to Giambattista Vico, whose cyclical model for history and its four distinct eras (as discussed in The New Science) guided Joyce’s scaffolding of the Wake’s tetrahedral structure. The coincident connotations of Dublin’s peripheral streets and Viconian cycles combine in the added allusion to Vico road in Dalkey. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen
Finnegans Wake violer “Sir Tristram, violer d’amores” (FW 003.04) Re-appropriation of the French verb violer (to violate) as a noun, as in the French violeur (rapist). In this context, the phrase “violer d’amores” characterises a violator of loves (Portuguese, d’amores). “Violer”, if pronounced with a “ə”, also echoes “viola”. A “viola d’amore” is a seven-stringed musical instrument. Ciaran McMorran & Terence Killeen